MIL in Malmö: Methods, information, and learning as tools for integration

DEVELOPING INDICATORS AND EVALUATION METHODS TO MEASURE INTEGRATION

The MIL in Malmö project will take its basis in a concrete integration- and social change project in one of Malmö’s housing projects and develop indicators and evaluation methods to measure advances, adjust policies, further cooperative and comparative learning and assess system impact. Special focus is on developing a method for a socio-economic accounting and socio-economic calculation methods of how regeneration and change can create a city founded on social, environmental and economic sustainability. The project started in November 2012 and runs to June 2014, and it’s funded by the European Integration Fund.

Contact: Per-Anders Hillgren & Bo Peterson

Partners: City of Malmö, and several departments at Malmö University including Urban Studies, Health & Society and Medea.

Medea’s role in this project
This project is a continuation of the work carried out within Medea’s Living Lab the Neighbourhood. Medea’s role in this project is to explore how tenants can be stimulated, through dialogue and collaborative processes, to take part in the development of an economical, social, and environmentally sustainable neighbourhoods, and develop services that support sustainable lifestyles.

Project description
The city of Malmö has established itself as a city that can deliver solutions to many of the challenges that cities of the world are facing. One particular area where Malmö has been successful is in how to transform a industrial city, with a decreasing population, to a “knowledge city” with new industries and a growing population, while at the same time establishing processes for an environmentally sustainable development.

On one important area, however, has Malmö not been able to deliver sustainable solutions: the social area. In Swedish media, as well as internationally, city districts such as Rosengård have been known as problem areas – and Malmö as a problem city. The social problems not only exist in Rosengård but are also characteristic for city districts such as Seved, Holma-Kroksbäck, Segevång and Lindängen. These districts are characterised by low results in schools, child poverty, low employment levels, criminality and a high reliance on social welfare. In these areas, there is a generally higher proportion of inhabitants with an ethnical background other than Swedish. It is a challenge for the city and the region to change this situation.

Malmö has since the 1980s worked with a number of programmes to decrease segregation and social problems. These have all had positive effects, but have not succeeded in reversing the trend towards increased segregation and economic and social inequality. The work over the years has often been characterised by a lack of systematic evaluation of the projects as a whole, as well as of specific actions within them. Neither have actions with positive effects been evaluated and documented enough, which has led to that even ambitious programmes have lacked the necessary continuity. Through the MIL in Malmö project, and the European Integration Fund, there is a great opportunity to build more systematic learning and to drive development of methods and analysis together with actors “on the ground” where successful integration work is most important.

The project will take its basis in a concrete integration- and social change project in one of Malmö’s housing projects (Lindängen) and develop indicators and evaluation methods to measure advances, adjust policies, further cooperative and comparative learning and assess system impact. Special focus is on developing a method for a socio-economic accounting and socio-economic calculation methods of how regeneration and change can create a city founded on social, environmental and economic sustainability.

In order to implement the findings from MIL in Malmö, and from the commission for a socially sustainable Malmö, Lindängen will be used as a case for concrete change in Malmö. Through this there are possibilities to test models and methods in a real environment, but also to extend the networks that have been created through the work of the commission for a socially sustainable Malmö. A successful model, developed in Lindängen or some other of the housing project areas in Malmö, can then be exported and implemented in other places in Sweden and Europe.

Image credit Malmö Stadsbibliotek CC:BY-NC

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