RDF graphics Copyright Flickr user amyvdh CC:BY-NC

Presentation on the discovery, re-use and integration of open data

Providing open data is of interest for both its societal and its commercial value, but also for transparency and because more people can do fun things with the data. But how do you provide access to data so it can be most easily reused? And how do you enable the discovery of relevant data within the multitude of available data sets?

Below is a presentation on “Open Data and Linked Data” that Marie Gustafsson Friberger, a computer science researcher and teacher at Malmö University, held on August 8, at the Hacknight event of Forskningsavdelningen a hackerspace in Malmö that serves as a meeting place with a focus on “learning by doing”, DIY culture and knowledge sharing with a focus on technology – computers, programming, mechanics, communication, electronics and art.

Summary of this presentation
Providing open data is of interest for its societal and commercial value, for transparency, and because more people can do fun things with data. There is a growing number of initiatives to provide open data, from, for example, the UK government and the World Bank. However, much of this data is provided in formats such as Excel files, or even PDF files. This raises the question of:

– How best to provide access to data so it can be most easily reused?
– How to enable the discovery of relevant data within the multitude of available data sets?
– How to enable applications to integrate data from large numbers of formerly unknown data sources?

One way to address these issues is to use the design principles of linked data, which suggest best practices for how to publish and connect structured data on the Web. This presentation gives an overview of linked data technologies (such as RDF and SPARQL), examples of how they can be used, as well as some starting points for people who want to provide and use linked data.

A somewhat rough video version of this presentation can also be found on Bambuser. More on linked data on linkeddata.org.

Image credit: amyvdh CC:BY-NC

Update April 17, 2012 – animation from Europeana

Linked Open Data from europeana on Vimeo.

This is a simple animation meant to explain what Linked Open Data is and why it’s a good thing, both for users and for data providers. To find more information about Europeana’s linked data pilot, visit data.europeana.eu.