Games in Learning

This is a listicle* on games in learning. You might enjoy it if you’re looking for a point of entry to game studies in general and educational games in particular. Many thanks to Elisabet Nilsson for sharing these links!

First of all, gamifying education might not always be the best way to improve student performance. There are other ways of using digital media that works even better. You should get acquainted with the essay collection learningthroughdigitalmedia.net (2011), a collection that presents easy-to-read case studies of how wikis, social networking platforms and Google Docs (etc.) have been used successfully in class.

Educational games
Serious Games – a list of “serious games”, games designed for a primary purpose other than pure entertainment.

10 Great Sites for Finding Free Educational Games and The Top 10 Free Educational Video Games from Educational Games Research (research and discussion concerning instructional video games)

Learning games for PC – everything from Wordplay to Spongebob.

Food Force – a game built in collaboration with UN agency World Food Programme, trying to educate kids on the global food delivery chain.

Game research(ers)
Jason Rutter – School for Mass Communication Research at Catholic University of Leuven in Belgium.
Jonas Linderoth – University of Gothenburg.
David Shaffer – University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Eric Klopfer – MIT
Kurt Squire – University of Wisconsin–Madison.
Jesper Juul – video game researcher.
Ian Bogost – the creator of epic Facebook game Cow Clicker.
Elisabet M Nilsson – games researcher at Malmö university with the dissertation “Simulated ‘real’ worlds: Actions mediated through computer game play in science education”.
Simon Niedenthal – games researcher at Malmö university with the dissertation “Complicated Shadows: the Aesthetic Significance of Simulated Illumination in Digital Games
Mikael Jacobsson games researcher at Malmö university with the dissertation “Virtual worlds and social interaction design

Jane McGonigal and James Paul Gee – added to this list after suggestion from @jamesriggall

*Listicle is a portmanteau word, a conflation of the terms list and article. It is generally used in journalism and blogging to refer to short-form writing that uses a list as its thematic structure, but is fleshed out with sufficient verbiage to be published as an article. (source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Listicle)